-1
archive,paged,author,author-aydin-alinejad,author-4,paged-2,author-paged-2,qode-social-login-1.1.3,qode-restaurant-1.1.1,stockholm-core-2.3,select-child-theme-ver-1.1,select-theme-ver-8.9,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,paspartu_enabled,menu-animation-underline,fs-menu-animation-underline,header_top_hide_on_mobile,,qode_grid_1300,qode_menu_center,qode-mobile-logo-set,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.6.0,vc_responsive

Welcome, Matthias Leanza!

In early October, Matthias Leanza joins global dis:connect as a new fellow. Welcome to Munich, Matthias! Matthias Leanza is a historical sociologist specialising in empires, colonialism and nation-state formation and is a senior lecturer at the University of Basel. At global dis:connect Matthias will complete his current book project on the legacy of German colonialism. Drawing on a wide range of sources from European and African archives, the study shows how and why the German overseas empire helped consolidate the nascent German nation-state. Germany soon lost its colonies, but their effects on the country persisted, leaving a complex legacy. Continue Reading

Valeska Huber takes up fellowship

In October Valeska Huber commenced her term as a fellow at global dis:connect. Welcome. Valeska Huber is a professor at the University of Vienna. She has led an Emmy Noether Research Group and has been a fellow at the German Historical Institute London. She is particularly interested in the mutual interdependence of opening and closure. During her fellowship at global dis:connect, she will work on a monograph about the 20th-century dream of universal literacy, tracing the Each One Teach One method propagated by US missionary Frank C. Laubach and applied around the globe from the Philippines to Cuba and Brazil. Continue Reading

Joël Glasman joins global dis:connect

A warm welcome to our new guest Joël Glasman who joins global dis:connect in october.

Joël is a Professor of African History at University of Bayreuth. He focuses on West and Central Africa in the 20th century, particularly colonialism, governmentality, humanitarianism and the production of power as framed by praxis theory and science and technology studies. His publications inquire into social classifications produced by state institutions, international governmentality and private corporations. He further engages with the theory of global history, global norms and colonialism. His last book, Les humanités humanitaires. Manuel d’autodéfense à l’usage des volontaires (2023), reflects on the practical use of the humanities.

Joël’s project At gd:c, Empire of waste, looks at imperialism as a regime of waste built on material exploitation and racial inequalities. Immobilisation, hiding and destruction of waste played a crucial role in imperial domination, as indicated by recent research on toxicity, waste dumping and radioactivity in Africa.

Continue Reading

David Motadel takes up fellowship

In September David Motadel commenced his term as a fellow at global dis:connect. Welcome. David Motadel is an associate professor of international history at the LSE. A former Gates Scholar at Cambridge, he has held visiting positions at Harvard, Yale, Oxford, Sciences Po and the Sorbonne. At gd:c he is working on a global history of Europe’s empires around the Second World War, 1935-1948, exploring the history of the war in the imperial world, its impact on colonial subjects; the history of the colonial soldiers who fought in Europe’s armies; the history of anti-colonial movements during the war, from the Viet Minh to the Quit India movement; and the war’s impact on the end of empire and twentieth-century world order. Continue Reading

Günther Sandner joins global dis:connect

A warm welcome to our new fellow Günther Sandner who joins global dis:connect in early September. Günther Sandner is a political scientist and historian. He works as a research fellow at the Institute Vienna Circle (University of Vienna) and teaches civic education extramurally. His research includes the history of logical empiricism and Isotype.   His project at gd:c, Following Isotype: visual languages and universal symbols in the decades after 1945, deals with projects that aimed to overcome the active absence of a universal language and to establish one with the help of pictures, graphics, symbols and pictograms. Its focus is on the 1950s and 1960s. Continue Reading

Welcome, Ayala Levin!

In early September, Ayala Levin joins global dis:connect as a new fellow. Welcome to Munich, Ayala! Ayala Levin is an associate professor of architectural history at the University of California, Los Angeles. Ayala specialises in architecture and urban planning in postcolonial African states with interest in the production of architectural knowledge as part of north-south or south-south exchange.   At global dis:connect Ayala will research how U.S. planners sought to reorganise rural spaces in post-independence African states to curb urban migration. Continue Reading

Judd C. Kinzley commences fellowship at global dis:connect

Judd C. Kinzley from the University of Wisconsin-Madison joined global dis:connect in early July. Judd Kinzley is a professor of modern Chinese history. His research treats borderlands, materiality and natural resources.  He is currently working on the transnational exchange of Chinese raw materials for cash, weapons and industrial goods during World War II. This work reveals the transnational networks that developed to finance, produce and transport such resources. These trans-Pacific networks channelled objects in both directions during the war and served as the blueprint of a new postwar international order. His project at gd:c focuses on the legacies of Allied wartime oil exports to China , the Middle East, SE Asia, the US and the European powers together.   Continue Reading

Michael Goebel joins global dis:connect

A warm welcome to our new guest Michael Goebel who joins global dis:connect in early September.

 Michael Goebel is the Einstein Professor of Global History and co-director of the Frankreich-Zentrum at Freie Universität Berlin. He earned his Ph.D. from University College London (2006) and in 2018–21 was the Pierre du Bois Chair Europe and the World at the Geneva Graduate Institute.

 

At gd:c, he’s investigating the interrelationship between globalisation and inequality in Latin America and SE Asian port cities.

Continue Reading

Ifeoluwa Aboluwade takes up fellowship

In September Ifeoluwa Aboluwade commenced her term as a fellow at global dis:connect. Welcome. Ifeoluwa Aboluwade is a literary scholar with a background in imperial and literary history, early modern English theatre, critical digital humanities, (trans)cultural translation and adaptation, black diaspora studies, postcolonial literary criticism, and gender and intersectionality. She works at the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence and is a lecturer at the University of Bayreuth. Ifeoluwa has received many international awards and fellowships, such as Fulbright and DAAD scholarships, most recently receiving the Shakespeare Association of America-Folger Shakespeare Library Short Term Fellowship (2022/2023). At gd:c she is investigating the histories, patterns and genealogies (dis)connecting Shakespearean drama through topoi of trickster and warrior. Continue Reading

25–28 July 2023, Summer School: Britain, the British Empire and Migration

Migration has always been a part of human history and is a central feature of the modern world. In fact, the world which we inhabit today is unimaginable without large-scale movements of populations, groups, and communities across the globe. Contemporary rhetoric on migration tends to focus exclusively on migration into Britain and immigration is a politically volatile subject in current public discourse in most European nations. However, historically in the case of Britain and the British Empire, migration also meant emigration from Britain into what are described as settler colonies. Like other contemporary European empires, the British Empire was made possible by large-scale migration and became a platform for migrant populations across the world. This summer school will engage with British and imperial inward and outward migration from the nineteenth century until today.   Our tutors, the eminent scholars Marjory Harper (Professor in History, University of Aberdeen) and Gurminder K. Bhambra (Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in International Relations, University of Sussex) will discuss key questions related to migration such as causes and experiences of emigration as well as questions of citizenship and the history of migration as a fundamental link between national and imperial history. Finally, the course will explore how migration in the context of Britain’s imperial past has shaped, and continues to shape, modern Britain. Topic-related excursions in London are planned.  
The summer school is a part of the on-going collaboration between the German Historical Institute London and the Ludwigs-Maximilian University, Munich. The course convenors are Professor Tanja Buehrer (LMU Munich) and Dr Indra Sengupta (GHI London).  
The course will take place at the German Historical Institute London on 25-28 July 2023. It is aimed at advanced BA or MA students of history, English or other related subjects at all German universities. An interest in the history of the British Empire and the history of migration in the modern world is desirable.
  Please click HERE for the call and HERE to download the programme.
  Continue Reading