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Associated fellows

Though funded by affiliated institutions, our associated fellows enrich and honour global dis:connect by sharing their ideas, insights and research with us here on site.

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peter becker

munich centre for global history

Peter Becker is a professor of Austrian History in Vienna. Before joining the University of Vienna, he was a professor in European History at the EUI in Florence. His research covers criminology as discourse and institutional practice, state building, governance and public administration, with a focus on the interplay between regional and national actor networks, global policy formation and international organisations: Remaking Central Europe (2020), edited with N. Wheatly in 2020 and A World of Contradictions: Globalization and Deglobalization in Interwar Europe (2023), ed. with T. Zahra.

 

Recent crises have brought the role of states into focus. The state’s scope of action has expanded, even though states are less sovereign than reliant on engagement with international organizations and collaboration with national and regional interest groups in these crises. My project uses these observations for a history of crisis management by modern states in a complex multi-level system, in which international state and non-state actors act together with governments of individual states, their expert committees, and local and regional networks of actors. I begin looking at the transformation crisis after the Great War and how the League responded to it.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Peter.

_X8Q3095

peter becker

munich centre for global history

Click HERE to email Peter.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Peter Becker is a professor of Austrian History in Vienna. Before joining the University of Vienna, he was a professor in European History at the EUI in Florence. His research covers criminology as discourse and institutional practice, state building, governance and public administration, with a focus on the interplay between regional and national actor networks, global policy formation and international organisations: Remaking Central Europe (2020), edited with N. Wheatly in 2020 and A World of Contradictions: Globalization and Deglobalization in Interwar Europe (2023), ed. with T. Zahra.

 

Recent crises have brought the role of states into focus. The state’s scope of action has expanded, even though states are less sovereign than reliant on engagement with international organizations and collaboration with national and regional interest groups in these crises. My project uses these observations for a history of crisis management by modern states in a complex multi-level system, in which international state and non-state actors act together with governments of individual states, their expert committees, and local and regional networks of actors. I begin looking at the transformation crisis after the Great War and how the League responded to it.

Blickle Bild

Paul Blickle

university of Basel

Paul Blickle is a PhD candidate at the LMU Munich. He received his BA (2017) and MA (2020) in history from the University of Heidelberg and spent a year abroad at the University of Durham and Yale University each. Since 2021, Paul has been working as a research assistant to Roland Wenzlhuemer. From September 2022 to September 2023, he is acting-managing editor of the review journal sehepunkte. Paul’s research interests include maritime history, port cities and steam power in the 19th century.

 

Paul’s dissertation investigates the global history of ship’s ballast in the 19th century (on ships, in ports, shipyards and markets). Ballast — commercially useless makeweight — served to stabilise ships on the high seas and thus enabled global connection at sea. At the same time, its absence or presence could have considerable dis:connective effects in that the universal need for ballast disrupted the transfer of goods from ship to shore, illegal ballast-dumping silted harbours and estuaries, and the (non)availability of ballast affected shipping routes and trade-patterns.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Paul.

Blickle Bild

Paul Blickle

university of basel

Click HERE to email Paul.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Paul Blickle is a PhD candidate at the LMU Munich. He received his BA (2017) and MA (2020) in history from the University of Heidelberg and spent a year abroad at the University of Durham and Yale University each. Since 2021, Paul has been working as a research assistant to Roland Wenzlhuemer. From September 2022 to September 2023, he is acting-managing editor of the review journal sehepunkte. Paul’s research interests include maritime history, port cities and steam power in the 19th century.

 

Paul’s dissertation investigates the global history of ship’s ballast in the 19th century (on ships, in ports, shipyards and markets). Ballast — commercially useless makeweight — served to stabilise ships on the high seas and thus enabled global connection at sea. At the same time, its absence or presence could have considerable dis:connective effects in that the universal need for ballast disrupted the transfer of goods from ship to shore, illegal ballast-dumping silted harbours and estuaries, and the (non)availability of ballast affected shipping routes and trade-patterns.

Dr Lachlan FleetwoodPost Doc Research Fellow, UCD School of History

Lachlan Fleetwood

msca fellow

Lachlan Fleetwood is historian of science, empire, geography and the environment. He completed a PhD at Cambridge and subsequently held fellowships at University College Dublin and Yale. He comes to LMU as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow. His work focuses on the uneven imposition of ostensibly global environmental categories by empires in the long nineteenth century. His research also investigates how geographical features like mountains and deserts can serve as scales for new global histories of science, empire and labour. His first book, Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2022.

 

At global dis:connect, Lachlan is completing a project titled Imperial science and the habitability of Central Asia and Mesopotamia, 1815-1914: a history of the societal consequences of changing limits. This history of environmental sciences examines ideas of habitability, uninhabitability and climatic determinism in relation to empire, and it traces their postcolonial legacies in the age of climate crisis.

Soon to be updated.

Click HERE to email Lachlan.

Dr Lachlan FleetwoodPost Doc Research Fellow, UCD School of History

Lachlan Fleetwood

msca fellow

Click HERE to email Lachlan.

Soon to be updated.

Lachlan Fleetwood is historian of science, empire, geography and the environment. He completed a PhD at Cambridge and subsequently held fellowships at University College Dublin and Yale. He comes to LMU as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow. His work focuses on the uneven imposition of ostensibly global environmental categories by empires in the long nineteenth century. His research also investigates how geographical features like mountains and deserts can serve as scales for new global histories of science, empire and labour. His first book, Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2022.

 

At global dis:connect, Lachlan is completing a project titled Imperial science and the habitability of Central Asia and Mesopotamia, 1815-1914: a history of the societal consequences of changing limits. This history of environmental sciences examines ideas of habitability, uninhabitability and climatic determinism in relation to empire, and it traces their postcolonial legacies in the age of climate crisis.

Gidney Head Shot

Catherine Gidney

munich centre for global history

Catherine Gidney is an adjunct research professor of history at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, N.B., Canada. Her research focuses on the intersection of the history of education and other fields such as youth culture, health and religion in 20th-century Canada. She most recently authored Captive Audience: How Corporations Invaded Our Schools (Between the Lines, 2019) and co-edited Feeling Feminism: Activism, Affect, and Canada’s Second Wave (UBC Press, 2022). In 2016 she was elected to the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

 

Catherine’s current research focuses on the history of the modern mindfulness movement. She is particularly interested in the transformation of mindfulness from a primarily countercultural and individual practice to one prominently featured in global corporations. Her research aims to shed light not only on the origins and spread of the mindfulness movement, but also on the role and implications of this movement in the processes of cultural globalisation.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Catherine.

Gidney Head Shot

Catherine Gidney

munich centre for global history

Click HERE to email Catherine.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Catherine Gidney is an adjunct research professor of history at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, N.B., Canada. Her research focuses on the intersection of the history of education and other fields such as youth culture, health and religion in 20th-century Canada. She most recently authored Captive Audience: How Corporations Invaded Our Schools (Between the Lines, 2019) and co-edited Feeling Feminism: Activism, Affect, and Canada’s Second Wave (UBC Press, 2022). In 2016 she was elected to the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

 

Catherine’s current research focuses on the history of the modern mindfulness movement. She is particularly interested in the transformation of mindfulness from a primarily countercultural and individual practice to one prominently featured in global corporations. Her research aims to shed light not only on the origins and spread of the mindfulness movement, but also on the role and implications of this movement in the processes of cultural globalisation.

kevin ostoyich

spungen foundation

Hailing from Valparaiso University, Kevin Ostoyich has published on German migration, German-American history, historical pedagogy, the Holocaust and the Shanghai Jews. He has been interviewing Holocaust survivors for many years and is frequently invited to speak about the history of the Shanghai Jews around the world.

 

Kevin’s forthcoming volume, The Herero and the Shanghai Jews: Oral History in Genocide and Refugee Studies, will tell individual stories analyse two little-known groups via oral history. The oral-history approach provides a level of intimacy often missing in standard textbook treatments. The book will explore major themes of commonality and divergence among two groups who have experienced genocide and exile at different points in the twentieth century. The goal is to elucidate how victims relate their experiences across generations, the meanings accorded to the refugee experience, perceptions of commemorative activities and how oral history can illuminate the experiences of genocide and forced migration

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Kevin.

kevin ostoyich

spungen foundation

Click HERE to email Kevin.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Hailing from Valparaiso University, Kevin Ostoyich has published on German migration, German-American history, historical pedagogy, the Holocaust and the Shanghai Jews. He has been interviewing Holocaust survivors for many years and is frequently invited to speak about the history of the Shanghai Jews around the world.

 

Kevin’s forthcoming volume, The Herero and the Shanghai Jews: Oral History in Genocide and Refugee Studies, will tell individual stories analyse two little-known groups via oral history. The oral-history approach provides a level of intimacy often missing in standard textbook treatments. The book will explore major themes of commonality and divergence among two groups who have experienced genocide and exile at different points in the twentieth century. The goal is to elucidate how victims relate their experiences across generations, the meanings accorded to the refugee experience, perceptions of commemorative activities and how oral history can illuminate the experiences of genocide and forced migration

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Silke Reeploeg

munich centre for global history

Silke Reeploeg is an Associate Professor at Ilisimatusarfik (University of Greenland) where she teaches in the Department of Cultural and Social history. Her research focuses on memory cultures and hidden histories (including gender history). Other research interests are: critical arctic studies, heritage cultures,  micro-historical approaches, and anti-/decolonial perspectives. Before coming to Greenland in 2018 Silke worked at the University of Karlstad, Sweden and the University of the Highlands and Islands in Scotland (based in the Shetland Islands).

 

Arctic memory cultures are often seen as subject to, rather than active participants in imperial and colonial historical processes and narratives, yet are sites of multiple voices, significant geo-political domains, and concurrent national and colonial identities. Building on recent approaches to anti-/and decolonial perspectives in Arctic memory studies Silke‘s research at global:disconnect explores the relationships that shape cultural memory as an aspect of the coloniality of knowledge. Using both archival and published material, Silke studies the making and remaking of Artic Memory Cultures as both global and transnational memory spaces (Transnationale Erinnerungsorte) – but also shaped by the coloniality of global processes.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Silke.

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Silke Reeploeg

munich centre for global history

Click HERE to email Silke.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Silke Reeploeg is an Associate Professor at Ilisimatusarfik (University of Greenland) where she teaches in the Department of Cultural and Social history. Her research focuses on memory cultures and hidden histories (including gender history). Other research interests are: critical arctic studies, heritage cultures,  micro-historical approaches, and anti-/decolonial perspectives. Before coming to Greenland in 2018 Silke worked at the University of Karlstad, Sweden and the University of the Highlands and Islands in Scotland (based in the Shetland Islands).

 

Arctic memory cultures are often seen as subject to, rather than active participants in imperial and colonial historical processes and narratives, yet are sites of multiple voices, significant geo-political domains, and concurrent national and colonial identities. Building on recent approaches to anti-/and decolonial perspectives in Arctic memory studies Silke‘s research at global:disconnect explores the relationships that shape cultural memory as an aspect of the coloniality of knowledge. Using both archival and published material, Silke studies the making and remaking of Artic Memory Cultures as both global and transnational memory spaces (Transnationale Erinnerungsorte) – but also shaped by the coloniality of global processes.

Schmidt

Benjamin Schmidt

munich centre for global history

Ben is the Bridgman Professor of History at the University of Washington. His work sits at the crossroads of cultural history, visual and material studies, and the history of science. He focuses chiefly on Europe’s engagement with the world in the first age of globalism. His books include Innocence Abroad: The Dutch Imagination and the New World, winner of the RSA Gordan Prize, and Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe’s Early Modern World, finalist for the Kenshur Prize. His most recent book, The Globalization of Netherlandish Art (with T. Weststeijn), is forthcoming this year.

 

Ben’s gd:c project focuses on global ‘things’ — material artifacts that can be literally grasped — and ways they dis:connect early modern global cultures. It analyses materials and material technologies that served as critical intermediaries in an earlier age of global entanglement — media that mediated, as it were, transcultural transactions. In Munich, he’ll be working on a set of carved coconut cups, enlisted to probe the possibilities of ‘decorative colonialism’: a heuristic device to understand how empire was materially consumed by early modern Europeans.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Benjamin.

Schmidt

Benjamin Schmidt

munich centre for global history

Click HERE to email Benjamin.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Ben is the Bridgman Professor of History at the University of Washington. His work sits at the crossroads of cultural history, visual and material studies, and the history of science. He focuses chiefly on Europe’s engagement with the world in the first age of globalism. His books include Innocence Abroad: The Dutch Imagination and the New World, winner of the RSA Gordan Prize, and Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe’s Early Modern World, finalist for the Kenshur Prize. His most recent book, The Globalization of Netherlandish Art (with T. Weststeijn), is forthcoming this year.

 

Ben’s gd:c project focuses on global ‘things’ — material artifacts that can be literally grasped — and ways they dis:connect early modern global cultures. It analyses materials and material technologies that served as critical intermediaries in an earlier age of global entanglement — media that mediated, as it were, transcultural transactions. In Munich, he’ll be working on a set of carved coconut cups, enlisted to probe the possibilities of ‘decorative colonialism’: a heuristic device to understand how empire was materially consumed by early modern Europeans.

Callie Wilkinson

msca fellow

Callie Wilkinson studies the dramatic expansion of the British Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and its sociocultural impact at home and abroad. In previous research projects conducted at Cambridge and the University of Warwick, she has examined how the idea of indirect rule was contested within the British East India Company as well as the contemporary debates on the extent to which information about the Company should be disseminated to the public.

 

At global dis:connect, Callie is investigating how Company soldiers’ testimony affected broader discourses about the Company’s military operations in an age before professional war correspondents.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to email Callie.

Callie Wilkinson

msca fellow

Click HERE to email Callie.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Callie Wilkinson studies the dramatic expansion of the British Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and its sociocultural impact at home and abroad. In previous research projects conducted at Cambridge and the University of Warwick, she has examined how the idea of indirect rule was contested within the British East India Company as well as the contemporary debates on the extent to which information about the Company should be disseminated to the public.

 

At global dis:connect, Callie is investigating how Company soldiers’ testimony affected broader discourses about the Company’s military operations in an age before professional war correspondents.