-1
archive,paged,category,category-news,category-121,paged-2,category-paged-2,qode-social-login-1.1.3,qode-restaurant-1.1.1,stockholm-core-2.3,select-child-theme-ver-1.1,select-theme-ver-8.9,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,paspartu_enabled,menu-animation-underline,fs-menu-animation-underline,header_top_hide_on_mobile,,qode_grid_1300,qode_menu_center,qode-mobile-logo-set,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.6.0,vc_responsive

Günther Sandner joins global dis:connect

A warm welcome to our new fellow Günther Sandner who joins global dis:connect in early September. Günther Sandner is a political scientist and historian. He works as a research fellow at the Institute Vienna Circle (University of Vienna) and teaches civic education extramurally. His research includes the history of logical empiricism and Isotype.   His project at gd:c, Following Isotype: visual languages and universal symbols in the decades after 1945, deals with projects that aimed to overcome the active absence of a universal language and to establish one with the help of pictures, graphics, symbols and pictograms. Its focus is on the 1950s and 1960s. Continue Reading

Welcome, Ayala Levin!

In early September, Ayala Levin joins global dis:connect as a new fellow. Welcome to Munich, Ayala! Ayala Levin is an associate professor of architectural history at the University of California, Los Angeles. Ayala specialises in architecture and urban planning in postcolonial African states with interest in the production of architectural knowledge as part of north-south or south-south exchange.   At global dis:connect Ayala will research how U.S. planners sought to reorganise rural spaces in post-independence African states to curb urban migration. Continue Reading

Judd C. Kinzley commences fellowship at global dis:connect

Judd C. Kinzley from the University of Wisconsin-Madison joined global dis:connect in early July. Judd Kinzley is a professor of modern Chinese history. His research treats borderlands, materiality and natural resources.  He is currently working on the transnational exchange of Chinese raw materials for cash, weapons and industrial goods during World War II. This work reveals the transnational networks that developed to finance, produce and transport such resources. These trans-Pacific networks channelled objects in both directions during the war and served as the blueprint of a new postwar international order. His project at gd:c focuses on the legacies of Allied wartime oil exports to China , the Middle East, SE Asia, the US and the European powers together.   Continue Reading

Michael Goebel joins global dis:connect

A warm welcome to our new guest Michael Goebel who joins global dis:connect in early September.

 Michael Goebel is the Einstein Professor of Global History and co-director of the Frankreich-Zentrum at Freie Universität Berlin. He earned his Ph.D. from University College London (2006) and in 2018–21 was the Pierre du Bois Chair Europe and the World at the Geneva Graduate Institute.

 

At gd:c, he’s investigating the interrelationship between globalisation and inequality in Latin America and SE Asian port cities.

Continue Reading

Ifeoluwa Aboluwade takes up fellowship

In September Ifeoluwa Aboluwade commenced her term as a fellow at global dis:connect. Welcome. Ifeoluwa Aboluwade is a literary scholar with a background in imperial and literary history, early modern English theatre, critical digital humanities, (trans)cultural translation and adaptation, black diaspora studies, postcolonial literary criticism, and gender and intersectionality. She works at the Africa Multiple Cluster of Excellence and is a lecturer at the University of Bayreuth. Ifeoluwa has received many international awards and fellowships, such as Fulbright and DAAD scholarships, most recently receiving the Shakespeare Association of America-Folger Shakespeare Library Short Term Fellowship (2022/2023). At gd:c she is investigating the histories, patterns and genealogies (dis)connecting Shakespearean drama through topoi of trickster and warrior. Continue Reading

guided tour through the exhibition “travelling back: reframing a 19-century exhibition from Munich to Brazil”

Guided tour with the curator Sabrina Moura at Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte Munich, time and date will be announced shortly. 

Travelling Back presents a critical perspective on the narratives and collections Bavarian scientists Johann Baptist von Spix (1781–1826) and Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius (1794–1868) brought from Brazil to Munich in the 19th century. The exhibition follows their extensive three-year journey across the Brazilian hinterland, including the Amazonian region.

Spanning 14 000 km, this expedition took place from 1817 to 1820 and was later chronicled in the multi-volume publication Reise in Brasilien (Travels in Brazil – 1823), providing a personal account of the scientists' encounters and perceptions of the country's varied landscapes, cultures and wildlife.

During their travels, Spix and Martius interacted with various indigenous groups and gathered numerous ethnographic, botanical and zoological specimens. These materials became foundational for several Bavarian institutions, like the Bavarian State Collections of Zoology and Botany, as well as the Königlich Ethnographische Sammlung, now the Museum Fünf Kontinente, established in 1862. Beyond tangible artifacts, these collections also treat the history of Isabella Miranha and Johann Juri, two indigenous children brought to Munich in 1820, who died tragically soon after their arrival. Unlike the scientists' evident presence in the city's landscape, the history of these children is marked by silences and absences in public memorial spaces.

The exhibition raises crucial questions about the coloniality underpinning the scientific pursuits of the natural-history project between Munich and Brazil in the 19th century. It examines the various displays and interpretations of Spix and Martius's collections from their arrival in Germany to the present, and it sheds light on the dis:connectivities of knowledge production behind these scientific endeavours. The idea is not only to inquire into the public reception of these experiences through a history of the gaze, but also to draw a critical examination through the lenses of present-day dialogues and initiatives. This includes new scientific practices of knowledge restitution, literary interpretations and contemporary perspectives from artists like Micheliny Verunschk (Brazil), Frauke Zabel (Germany), Yolanda Gutiérrez (Germany/ Mexico), Igor Vidor (Brazil), Elaine Pessoa (Brazil) and Gê Viana (Brazil).

Curator: Sabrina Moura, fellow at Käte Hamburger Research Centre global dis:connect   Continue Reading

Welcome, Sabrina Moura!

In early July, art historian Sabrina Moura joined global dis:connect as a new fellow. Welcome to Munich, Sabrina! Sabrina Moura is a teacher, researcher and curator from Brazil. She holds a Ph.D. in art history from the University of Campinas. She authored Arqueologia da Criação [Archeology of Creation, 2022] — a book on the work of Brazilian artist Rossini Perez — and edited Southern Panoramas: Perspectives for other geographies of thought (2015), which presents historical and artistic perspectives on the Global South. Her work has featured in Mousse MagazineZeitschrift für KulturwissenschaftenStedelijk Studies JournalAfrican ArtCritical Internventions3rd Text Africa, among others.   At global dis:connect Sabrina is developing Cabinet Exotica Performing Absent Agencies from the Dawn of Natural Sciences, a project that focuses on contemporary visual and performative strategies. Continue Reading

Nic Leonhardt commences fellowship at global dis:connect

Nic Leonhardt from the University of Cologne joined global dis:connect in early July. Nic Leonhardt is a theatre scholar and writer commenting on global theatre history; media, popular and visual cultures; and archiving and curating theatrical history. She has served as a senior researcher and fellow in multiple projects. Her latest monograph, Theatre Across Oceans. Mediators of Transatlantic Exchange (1890-1925), was published in 2021. She edits Global Theatre Histories and created the theatre history podcast Theatrescapes. Nic is co-president of SIBMAS. Together with artist Reza Nassrollahi, she runs the global art and charity project 1001SOUL.   At global dis:connect, Nic will address the challenges of global theatre histories and the difficulties in understanding and writing a globally interconnected history of the performing arts. Continue Reading

Ross Truscott joins global dis:connect

A warm welcome to our new guest Ross Truscott who joins global dis:connect in early June.

Ross Truscott is a researcher at the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR), University of the Western Cape, South Africa. Prior to joining the CHR in 2015, he held a postdoctoral fellowship in interdisciplinary feminist studies at Duke University. His work, drawing on psychoanalytic and postcolonial theory, is in the transdisciplinary field of psychosocial studies.

Ross’ current book project, The Order of Empathy, apprehends how empathy has been posited since the end of apartheid as a relation all South Africans should assume towards each other—what schools should inculcate in children, universities in students, and what the Constitution asks of every citizen. The book offers a genealogy of the injunction to put oneself into the position of others.

Continue Reading

Roii Ball takes up fellowship

In April, historian Roii Ball commenced his term as a fellow at global dis:connect. Welcome, Roii! Roii Ball is a social historian of nineteenth and twentieth-century Germany and Central Europe and their colonial entanglements. He is a postdoctoral lead researcher at the Religion and Politics Cluster of Excellence at the University of Münster. Ball earned his PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2021 with a dissertation on the social dynamics and bureaucratic practices of German colonisation in the Polish provinces of Prussia before WWI (Advisor: David Sabean).   Ball’s work focuses on family and kinship to explore histories of colonisation and their intersection with empire-making and nation-making. His research interests include the history of knowledge, history of childhood, environmental history, and digital history. He has held fellowships at the University of Cologne, the German Historical Institute in Warsaw, and the Leibnitz Institute for European History in Mainz. During 2023 and 2024, he will also be a visiting research fellow at global dis:connect. Continue Reading