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Current fellows

The cornerstone of the Centre is the fellowship programme, in which approximately ten scholars will be invited to Munich every twelve months. They will work on questions of dis:connection together with the Kolleg’s team and their peers in situ. Each fellow will also have the opportunity to host a workshop on the topic of their research. Alongside established, internationally renowned guests, younger fellows in the academic or artistic consolidation phase are also included. Thus, the Centre offers valuable opportunities for up-and-coming researchers in the humanities.

Short-term scholarships furnished by the Munich Centre for Global History supplement this programme. Actively integrating the epistemic potential of the arts is vitally important to the Centre. A fundamental assumption is that the arts have the capacity to offer counternarratives to hegemonic discourses, to supposed certainties and to entrenched viewpoints (including scholarly ones). The opportunities — and the risks — of artistic research and its critical position towards society and scholarship have barely been incorporated into academic research, its methods, practices and results. Particularly artists who operate on the boundary between the arts and the academy are to be invited as fellows in order to close the gap between academic research and artistic practice.

Arnab Dey

Currently an associate professor of history at the State University of New York at Binghamton, Arnab is a historian of modern India and the British Empire, with research interests centred around questions of law, labour and the environment. Arnab’s first monograph, Tea Environments and Plantation Culture looked at the monoculture tea enterprise of British east India. This study brought the plant and the plantation together in analysing the praxis and politics of commodity capitalism. His associated research agendas and publications have similarly involved tracing imperial capital, legal regimes and environmental transformations in the British colonial world and the Indian subcontinent.

 

Arnab’s project at global dis:connect will examine the ‘invisible’ costs and consequences of mining in the British Empire, especially in India, between 1820-1940. This imperial mainstay and its global dominance have been studied in terms of ‘overground’ activities and material relations of production. This project takes an ‘underground’ approach to highlight the ‘invisible’ and ‘precarious’ in transnational energy regimes. It will focus on obscure — and historiographically ignored – issues of industrial health and ecological ‘ruin’ to connect globalisation, work and the politics of ‘absence’.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Dr Lachlan FleetwoodPost Doc Research Fellow, UCD School of History

Lachlan Fleetwood

Lachlan Fleetwood is historian of science, empire, geography and the environment. He completed a PhD at Cambridge and subsequently held fellowships at University College Dublin and Yale. He comes to LMU as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow. His work focuses on the uneven imposition of ostensibly global environmental categories by empires in the long nineteenth century. His research also investigates how geographical features like mountains and deserts can serve as scales for new global histories of science, empire and labour. His first book, Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2022.

 

At global dis:connect, Lachlan is completing a project titled Imperial science and the habitability of Central Asia and Mesopotamia, 1815-1914: a history of the societal consequences of changing limits. This history of environmental sciences examines ideas of habitability, uninhabitability and climatic determinism in relation to empire, and it traces their postcolonial legacies in the age of climate crisis.

Soon to be updated.

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Andrea Frohne

Andrea is professor of African art history and Director of the School of Interdisciplinary Arts at Ohio University, with a joint appointment in the School of Art + Design and of African studies. Her first book is The African Burial Ground in New York City: Memory, Spirituality, and Space. Her second book titled Contemporary Arts from the Horn of Africa: Encounters Beyond Borders through Conflict, Colonialism, and Modernity is forthcoming. She earned her PhD from Binghamton University (State University of New York). She has taught at Cornell University, Pennsylvania State and Dickinson College.

I’m drafting a book titled Waterways in Contemporary Arts and Visual Culture of the African World.  The project pushes the boundaries of African art history, examining geographic features of water in relation to socio-political and geo-political histories and arts of the African world. Diverse waterways affect and inform the arts as a result of slavery, colonialism, migration, global production, piracy and Afro-politan travel. These water networks, tides, currents and fluidities envelop frictions connected to raw materials extraction, transportation and (im)mobility.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Gaussi

Jeanno Gaussi

artist fellow

Born in Kabul, and growing up in Kabul, Delhi and Berlin, Jeanno’s interests transcend national borders and genres. Initially focused on film and video art, her work now transcends genre boundaries. Starting from a narrative concept, she creates installations that include video, photography, objects and texts. Her art explores the places where she’s worked, travelled and had meaningful encounters. It engages with remembrance, identity  and the social and cultural processes associated with them. She develops projects in relation to the place of their creation, examining the unique aspects of her surroundings.

During her fellowship at global dis:connect, Jeanno will reflect and focus on a fragment of her childhood in India. By working with specific material, she reconnects with memories, decontextualising them and connecting them in a new form and narrative.

Click HERE for more info on Jeanno.

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Anna Grasskamp

Anna Grasskamp is Lecturer in Art History at the University of St Andrews. She is the author of Art and Ocean Objects of Early Modern Eurasia. Shells, Bodies, and Materiality (Amsterdam University Press, 2021) and Objects in Frames: Displaying Foreign Collectibles in Early Modern China and Europe (Reimer, 2019; second edition in preparation). Her articles have appeared in Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics, Renaissance Studies and other journals. Anna is a subject editor at the review journal SEHEPUNKTE and a member of the editorial boards of the book series Global Epistemicsand the Journal for the History of Knowledge.

 

Anna has been the Principal Investigator of two research projects funded by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council, “Ocean Objects: Maritime Material Culture in Southern China from a Global Perspective” (2018-2020) and “Upcycling Hong Kong: The Circular Economy of Recycling Material Culture in Pearl River Delta Jewelry Design” (2020–2022). At Käte Hamburger Kolleg “Dis:konnektivität in Globalisierungsprozessen” she will work on her project “Trash as Treasure: Value Disconnections and the Recycling of Chinese Matter in Art and Design, 1500–2020.”

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Ayşe Güngör

Ayşe Güngör is an art historian with a background in art theory, anthropology and curatorial practices. Her research examines the confluence of art and anthropology in the practices of contemporary artists from Turkey, broadening the frame via narratives of global art and cultural exchange and eco-art practices. She investigates theoretical debates on artistic representation and institutional frameworks.

 

At global:disconnect, she is investigating the global art discourses embedded in institutionalised contemporary art through the representation of Istanbul in Germany through several exhibitions since 2000. By examining this complex relationship of global interconnectedness, her research seeks to identify gaps and limitations in the globalisation processes of contemporary art from Turkey.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Yolanda Gutiérrez

artist fellow

Born in Mexico City and living in Hamburg, Yolanda Gutiérrez is a choreographer, video artist, curator and producer whose projects have appeared in a number of international festivals. She has worked with dancers, actors, wrestlers, musicians, DJs, composers, laypeople, children, costume designers and set designers throughout Europe, Asia, Latin America, the USA and Africa. Since 2017, she has choreographed the URBAN BODIES PROJECT and DECOLONYCITIES, consisting of decolonising audio walks with dance interventions.

 

Continuing her investigations into the connections between colonial pasts, architecture and the body, her work at global dis:connect, comprises three modules: a research phase, a period of reflection and a concluding project in Munich. Gutiérrez is looking forward to having the time to reflect and write about her five-year journey of dance interventions in urban spaces.

Click HERE for more info on Yolanda.

Click Here for more info on SHAPE THE FUTURE

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Viviana Iacob

Viviana Iacob is a theatre historian. Her work relies on interdisciplinary methodologies and a trans-regional reading of Eastern European theatre during the post-1945 period. Her research focuses on the history of international theatre organizations and their role in the globalization of state socialist cultures. Between May 2020 and July 2022, she was awarded a Humboldt Fellowship. The grant gave her the opportunity to develop a monograph which explores the trajectories of Eastern European theatre experts in international organizations. It highlights North-East-South connections and networks that these practitioners created during the Cold War.

 

Her project re-historicises the relationship between globalisation and theatre by analysing the practices of internationalisation and cultural diplomacy deployed by illiberal regimes before and after 1989. The project identifies trans-regional dis:connections that differ from those converging on or emerging from the West. The research combines the study of late-Cold War globalisation processes with a focus on international theatre organisations.  By highlighting alternative globalities, the project addresses patterns of integration and disintegration that have been marginalised by entrenched Western-centric discourses on recent histories of theatre.

 

Click HERE and HERE for Viviana’s latest work.

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Gabriele Klein

Gabriele Klein is a sociologist and dance scholar with a background in the sociology of body, movement and sport as well as dance and performance studies. Her work draws on a range of mixed methods. She has published almost 30 books and numerous articles on body aesthetics, body images and body politics, the globalisation of pop and dance cultures, dance theatre (especially on Pina Bausch), dance as and in protest culture and the transfer of African dance cultures to the global art market. Her current research addresses the tension between globalisation and (re)nationalisation, decolonisation and digitalisation.

 

Her project aims to explore the tension between the decline of in-person communication and the simultaneous expansion of digital communication using contemporary dance as an example. It aims to show how established artistic working methods, forms of communication and collaboration, and performance formats have changed since the Covid pandemic. It asks how this has transformed the perception and the understanding of dance.

 

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Kevin Ostoyich

Hailing from Valparaiso University, Kevin Ostoyich has published on German migration, German-American history, historical pedagogy, the Holocaust and the Shanghai Jews. He has been interviewing Holocaust survivors for many years and is frequently invited to speak about the history of the Shanghai Jews around the world.

 

Kevin’s forthcoming volume, The Herero and the Shanghai Jews: Oral History in Genocide and Refugee Studies, will tell individual stories analyse two little-known groups via oral history. The oral-history approach provides a level of intimacy often missing in standard textbook treatments. The book will explore major themes of commonality and divergence among two groups who have experienced genocide and exile at different points in the twentieth century. The goal is to elucidate how victims relate their experiences across generations, the meanings accorded to the refugee experience, perceptions of commemorative activities and how oral history can illuminate the experiences of genocide and forced migration.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Siddharth Pandey

Siddharth Pandey belongs to the Shimla Himalayas and has a PhD in English and Materiality Studies from Cambridge University. He has held fellowships and grants in global history, art history and colonial history at LMU, Yale, the Paul Mellon Centre, and the Charles Wallace India Trust. Pandey’s research interests include fantasy and children’s literature, nature and travel writing, craft theory, folk and popular culture. His first book, Fossil, explored the Himalayas through a geo-mythological-poetic lens, and is a finalist for the Banff Film and Mountain Literature Festival. His photographic-curatorial work has appeared in London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and Durham’s Oriental Museum, among other institutions.

 

Pandey’s project, ‘This fissured land’: ecological aesthetics, dwelling perspective and modernity’s entanglements in the Western Himalayas, studies the Himachal Himalayas as a terrain of belonging and natural-cultural rootedness. It also looks into how this sense of belonging —traditionally associated with a sensitive ecological attunement and aesthetic fulfilment — is threatened by modernity’s multifaceted pressures, which invariably lead to a growing sense of disconnection.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Martin Puchner

Martin Puchner has worked on such disparate topics as modernist closet dramas, revolutionary manifestos, Platonic dialogues, a history of world literature, environmental storytelling and Rotwelsch, the secret language of Central Europe. Having studied at the universities of Konstanz and Bologna, he pursued these topics at Columbia and Harvard, with shorter stints at Cornell, the Berlin Institute for Advanced Study, the New York Public Library and the American Academy. He occasionally attempts to bring the humanities to the attention of a larger public with op-eds, book reviews, essays, anthologies and open online courses.

 

At global dis:connect, Martin will expand his forthcoming history of culture, entitled Culture: the story of us, from cave art to K-pop, into a textbook introduction to the arts and humanities. The work focuses on mechanisms of transmission, with particular emphasis on interruption, misreading, appropriation and — of course — global dis:connections.

 

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Katarzyna Puzon

Katarzyna Puzon is an anthropologist and has conducted ethnographic research primarily in Lebanon and Germany. She has found academic homes in Beirut, Berlin, Edinburgh, London and Warsaw. Most of her work focuses on heritage, memory, mobility, loss and — more recently — sound and empire. Beyond publishing on these topics, she has produced diverse media, including a sound installation at the Amsterdam Museum.

 

At global dis:connect, Katarzyna is working on her new Daring Sounds project. Analysing connections and disconnections in relation to phonographic archives, this research examines how the archives’ entangled legacies might contribute to current debates on Europe’s colonial history and imperial past. By attending to sound, the project valorises listening as a critical interpretive approach.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Camille Serchuk

Camille is professor of art history at Southern Connecticut State University. She received her doctorate in art history from Yale in 1997, where she focused on images of medieval Paris. Since then, her research has focused primarily on the relationship between painting and mapmaking in late medieval and early modern Europe, with particular attention to the ways that artistic techniques and practices both enhanced and undermined the authority of cartography. The links between cartography and painting in 16th century France are also the subject of her recently completed book manuscript.

Her project, Border Control: Cartography and its Frames in Early Modernity, 1500-1650, explores how frames and border motifs animate early modern cartography and provide an interpretive lens for the mutable image of the world. Because knowledge of geography and sovereign boundaries were constantly in flux, frames enhanced the authority of maps that were almost immediately made obsolete by new exploration or conflict. As a new appraisal of the assertive role of the cartographic frame, the project will recuperate the agency of cartographic ornament, enhancing the legibility of early modern maps.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Katharina Wilkens

Katharina Wilkens is a scholar of religion with a wide range of interests, particularly in the fields of African religions and aesthetics of religion. After graduating in the study of religion, anthropology and Islamic studies at the University of Bayreuth, she taught at the universities of Heidelberg, Munich, Bayreuth, Zurich, Salzburg and Leipzig. Her PhD project was a case study of Catholic exorcism and healing in Tanzania. She has published on religious healing, spirit possession, the practice of drinking the Quran, travelogues written by Africans and the aesthetics of material texts.

In her current project, Katharina Wilkens studies the formation of religion, both as a discursive category and a social practice, under the auspices of African socialism from the 1950s to 1980s. In opposition to Marxism in the USSR, proponents of non-aligned African socialism insisted on the importance of religion for human society. While leaders such as Leopold Senghor and Julius Nyerere favoured Islam and Christianity, they neglected traditional religions and rather celebrated traditional arts and culture. The project examines global and local factors that contributed to this development.

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Callie Wilkinson

Callie Wilkinson studies the dramatic expansion of the British Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and its sociocultural impact at home and abroad. In previous research projects conducted at Cambridge and the University of Warwick, she has examined how the idea of indirect rule was contested within the British East India Company as well as the contemporary debates on the extent to which information about the Company should be disseminated to the public.

 

At global dis:connect, Callie is investigating how Company soldiers’ testimony affected broader discourses about the Company’s military operations in an age before professional war correspondents.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Franziska Windolf

artist fellow

Franziska Windolf is a visual artist currently exploring the performative potential of patchwork. She deconstructs the patchwork into ‘patch’ and ‘work’, understanding these terms as fragments and action in public or gallery spaces. For her, the artwork is a catalyst, a method of investigation, a means of connecting to people and a way to explore exile and commemoration. By contesting prevalent relationships and hierarchies, and by reassembling research findings, Franziska conceives the artwork as inconsistent, absurd and yet within reach.

 

While at global dis:connect, Franziska is working with diverse portable sculptures, whose forms emerge through encounters in public spaces. She creates an imaginary space of remembrance and reflection in which fragmented memories of exiled artists in the city as well as history of Munich find a poetic presence.

Soon to be updated.

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