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Past fellows

EnisMaci-┬®MaxZerrahn-05588

Enis Maci

Enis Maci is one of Europe’s most striking polyartists. She is the author of the essay collection Eiscafé Europa and a series of plays. Most recently, the collaboration “Ein faszinierender Plan” (Spector 2021) and the play “WUNDER” (Suhrkamp 2021) were published. In 2022, the play “Kamilo Beach”, co-written with Pascal Richmann, premiered at the Volksbühne am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz. This will be followed by the world premiere of LORBEER at Schauspiel Stuttgart. Her work has received several awards, most recently the Max Frisch Förderpreis. This year Enis is a fellow of global dis:connect and also a fellow of the Villa Aurora in Los Angeles.

 

While at global dis:connect, Enis works on Habitat – an exploration of mythologies of information, their global dissemination and the esoteric, yet tangible ways in which contentious narratives touch upon concrete bodies and subjectivities.

 

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Ann-Sophie Schoepfel

Ann-Sophie Schoepfel

Ann-Sophie Schoepfel’s intellectual background covers History, Art History, Anthropology, International Relations, International Law, and Legal History along with stops in Paris, Heidelberg, Tokyo, Hanoi and Harvard. Her research on the colonialist implications of war-crimes trials in Asia as well as on Vietnamese migration in the context of the Cold War has earned her numerous awards and academic honors.

 

Ann-Sophie’s current research at global dis:connect centers Afro-Asian voices — jurists, writers, and anticolonial revolutionaries — from across the French former colonial empire, as they struggled to reimagine state sovereignty and international law in the Cold War crucible.

 

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Martin Rempe

Martin Rempe

Martin Rempe studies modern German, European and African history, particularly the social history of cultural work as well as the history of colonialism, decolonisation and development. Transnational and global perspectives are at the heart of his research. Martin’s career path has led him through stints in Berlin, Strasbourg, Heidelberg, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Freiburg, Paris and Konstanz.

 

At global dis:connect, he is examining the role and significance of the military in civic musical life during the long 19th century from a global perspective. From the French Revolution to the First World War, military music shaped how music has come to be consumed, produced, appreciated and practised worldwide. Indeed, it has profoundly marked how we continue to valorise culture, and it propagated European music formations in distant geographies. Combining processes of rupture and continuity, displacement and integration, dis:connectivity is a key concept in grasping how military music has helped to (trans)form our world.

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Professur für Globalgeschichte des Spätmittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit

Christina Brauner

 

Christina Brauner’s research on cross-cultural diplomacy in West Africa, (dis)entanglement, translation, narratives of misunderstanding, and the history of religion has exposed her to the distinct academic cultures in Münster, Bielefeld, Berlin, London, Princeton, and her current academic home in Tubingen. Her work in global history is informed by a strong interest in theory and historical methodology, with a particular focus on the inescapable concepts of time and temporality.

 

At global dis:connect, Christina is investigating markets in the border region of the Lower Rhine, where competition and borders both constituted markets as social institutions and dis:connected the subjects involved.

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Sabine Soergel

Sabine Sörgel

Sabine Sörgel combines her passion for travel and dance with sophisticated, philosophically informed theories derived from critical theory, philosophy, sociology, and theatre. Through sojourns in Mainz, Aberystwyth, London, and Jamaica, Sabine has published on performance, post-colonial politics, global culture, and the social power implicated in various gazes.

 

While visiting global dis:connect, Sabine is researching how public performances over the last decade have invoked images of race, identity, rights, history, and memory.

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Fabienne Liptay

Fabienne Liptay

Fabienne Liptay is a professor of film studies at the University of Zurich. In her current research, she is particularly interested in moving-image practises that critically engage with the exclusions and inclusions in the institutional frames of global arts and media. Her research project Exhibiting Film: Challenges of Format, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, examines how formats have contributed to the establishment of global infrastructures of film exhibition, and it addresses what they have disabled and displaced.

 

At global dis:connect, Fabienne is investigating artistic and non-artistic uses of formats that challenge notions of connectivity. The focus is on contexts, in which formats based on interoperability not only facilitate processes of global networking, but also produce disconnections that are politically and socially effective.

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Heidi Tworek

Heidi Tworek

Heidi Tworek was a Global History short-term fellow at the Kolleg. She is a is a Canada Research Chair (Tier II) and Associate Professor, jointly appointed at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs and History at the University of British Columbia. Heidi received her BA (Hons) in Modern and Medieval Languages with a double first from Cambridge University and earned her PhD in History from Harvard University. She is an award-winning researcher of media, communications, health, platform governance, and international organizations.

 

In Munich, Heidi has been working on a project about the global history of health communications. By tracing how communications networks became crucial for combating pandemics in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, she explores the relationship between nations, empires, and international organizations. Communication alone could not have stopped epidemics like Ebola in 2014. But better communication could have saved thousands of lives, including during the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of health communications provides another way to understand how and why communications came to play as vital a role in disease management as medical treatments themselves.

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Olisa

Olisa Godson Muojama

Olisa Muojama was a Global History short-term fellow at the Kolleg. While in Munich, he has worked on a project with the title “German Subjects and Properties in Colonial West Africa during World War II, 1939-1945”. This study aims to examine the wartime relations between Germany and the Allied powers in their colonial territories of West Africa during the Second World War (1939-1945). It specifically deals with the wartime status and treatment of Germans (traders, professionals, researchers, and
missionaries) and their properties (firms, estates, factories, missions, patents and trade mark) in British West Africa during World War II, with a special emphasis on Nigeria, including the Cameroons under the British mandate.

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Kroupa

Sebestian Kroupa

Sebestian Kroupa was a Global History short-term fellow at the Kolleg. Sebestian is a historian of early modern natural sciences and medicine in global contexts. He is a Leverhulme Trust Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge and a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge. Prior to this appointment, he completed his PhD at the University of Cambridge and worked as Research Associate on the Wellcome-funded Renaissance Skin Project at King’s College London. Sebestian’s research seeks to uncover the variety of agencies across cultures, genders, and social status involved in the making of knowledge amidst the early modern expansion of global interactions, which engendered the birth of medicine, science, and the modern world. He has published on Indigenous tattooing in the Philippines, long-distance networks of knowledge exchange, and Renaissance geography and gorillas, as well as co-editing a special issue on science and islands in Indo-Pacific worlds.

 

At the Kolleg and the Munich Centre of Global History, Sebestian has worked on his monograph, Plants on the Move: The Making of Cross-Cultural Knowledge in Southeast Asia, c.1650–1750 which contributes to recent efforts to decentre and decolonise European histories of science, medicine, and modernity.

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Aenne Soell

Änne Söll

Änne’s work focuses on the art of the 20th and 21st centuries, particularly on aspects of gender, mainly masculinities. Other areas of interest are period rooms, magazines, photography, video installations and the art of the Weimar Republik, specifically the Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity).

 

While at global dis:connect, Änne is reconstructing the lives of three Jewish art historians — all women — who were forced to flee Germany in the 1930s and went on to forge successful careers as curators in the USA from 1950s onwards. A key question is how the strategies employed by these female art historians bridge the gaps and/or dealt with the voids in their professional careers while trying to re-connect to the global world of art history.

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NathanMacDonald

Nathan MacDonald

Nathan MacDonald was a Global History short-term fellow at the Kolleg. Nathan is Professor of the Interpretation of the Old Testament at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St John’s College.

 

In Munich, he worked on the transformations that occurred to the Jerusalem priesthood and its rituals as the small kingdom of Judah experienced dramatic changes during the late first millennium.

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Bernhard Schaer

Bernhard Schär

Bernhard was an ERC Marie Curie Fellow at the KHK. He is working on a project entitled: “European Mercenaries in the Dutch Empire. A connected History of Imperial Europe and Colonial Indonesia, c. 1800-1900”.

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Toivanen-Mikko

Mikko Toivanen

Mikko Toivanen (Florence/Warsaw) was a fellow funded by the Osk. Huttunen Foundation. He is working on a postdoctoral project entitled “Staging a Colonial Capital: The Construction of Public Space in Singapore and Batavia through Spectacle and Ceremony, 1845-1870.” The project examines the development of urban culture and ceremonial use of public space in Southeast Asia in the late 19th century, while seeking to address contemporary debates about imperial legacies in postcolonial urban landscapes.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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