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Current fellows

The cornerstone of the Centre is the fellowship programme, in which approximately ten scholars will be invited to Munich every twelve months. They will work on questions of dis:connection together with the Kolleg’s team and their peers in situ. Each fellow will also have the opportunity to host a workshop on the topic of their research. Alongside established, internationally renowned guests, younger fellows in the academic or artistic consolidation phase are also included. Thus, the Centre offers valuable opportunities for up-and-coming researchers in the humanities.

Short-term scholarships furnished by the Munich Centre for Global History supplement this programme. Actively integrating the epistemic potential of the arts is vitally important to the Centre. A fundamental assumption is that the arts have the capacity to offer counternarratives to hegemonic discourses, to supposed certainties and to entrenched viewpoints (including scholarly ones). The opportunities — and the risks — of artistic research and its critical position towards society and scholarship have barely been incorporated into academic research, its methods, practices and results. Particularly artists who operate on the boundary between the arts and the academy are to be invited as fellows in order to close the gap between academic research and artistic practice.

Professur für Globalgeschichte des Spätmittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit

Christina Brauner

Christina Brauner’s research on cross-cultural diplomacy in West Africa, (dis)entanglement, translation, narratives of misunderstanding, and the history of religion has exposed her to the distinct academic cultures in Münster, Bielefeld, Berlin, London, Princeton, and her current academic home in Tubingen. Her work in global history is informed by a strong interest in theory and historical methodology, with a particular focus on the inescapable concepts of time and temporality.

 

At global dis:connect, Christina is investigating markets in the border region of the Lower Rhine, where competition and borders both constituted markets as social institutions and dis:connected the subjects involved.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.

Ayse Gungor

Ayşe Güngör

Ayşe Güngör is an art historian with a background in art theory, anthropology and curatorial practices. Her research examines the confluence of art and anthropology in the practices of contemporary artists from Turkey, broadening the frame via narratives of global art and cultural exchange and eco-art practices. She investigates theoretical debates on artistic representation and institutional frameworks.

 

At global:disconnect, she is investigating the global art discourses embedded in institutionalised contemporary art through the representation of Istanbul in Germany through several exhibitions since 2000. By examining this complex relationship of global interconnectedness, her research seeks to identify gaps and limitations in the globalisation processes of contemporary art from Turkey.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.

Fabienne Liptay

Fabienne Liptay

Fabienne Liptay is a professor of film studies at the University of Zurich. In her current research, she is particularly interested in moving-image practises that critically engage with the exclusions and inclusions in the institutional frames of global arts and media. Her research project Exhibiting Film: Challenges of Format, funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, examines how formats have contributed to the establishment of global infrastructures of film exhibition, and it addresses what they have disabled and displaced.

 

At global dis:connect, Fabienne is investigating artistic and non-artistic uses of formats that challenge notions of connectivity. The focus is on contexts, in which formats based on interoperability not only facilitate processes of global networking, but also produce disconnections that are politically and socially effective.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.

EnisMaci-┬®MaxZerrahn-05588

Enis Maci

Enis Maci is one of Europe’s most striking polyartists. She is the author of the essay collection Eiscafé Europa and a series of plays. Most recently, the collaboration “Ein faszinierender Plan” (Spector 2021) and the play “WUNDER” (Suhrkamp 2021) were published. In 2022, the play “Kamilo Beach”, co-written with Pascal Richmann, premiered at the Volksbühne am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz. This will be followed by the world premiere of LORBEER at Schauspiel Stuttgart. Her work has received several awards, most recently the Max Frisch Förderpreis. This year Enis is a fellow of global dis:connect and also a fellow of the Villa Aurora in Los Angeles.

While at global dis:connect, Enis works on Habitat – an exploration of mythologies of information, their global dissemination and the esoteric, yet tangible ways in which contentious narratives touch upon concrete bodies and subjectivities.

Click HERE for a list of works.

Click HERE to send email.

Martin Rempe

Martin Rempe

Martin Rempe studies modern German, European and African history, particularly the social history of cultural work as well as the history of colonialism, decolonisation and development. Transnational and global perspectives are at the heart of his research. Martin’s career path has led him through stints in Berlin, Strasbourg, Heidelberg, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Freiburg, Paris and Konstanz.

At global dis:connect, he is examining the role and significance of the military in civic musical life during the long 19th century from a global perspective. From the French Revolution to the First World War, military music shaped how music has come to be consumed, produced, appreciated and practised worldwide. Indeed, it has profoundly marked how we continue to valorise culture, and it propagated European music formations in distant geographies. Combining processes of rupture and continuity, displacement and integration, dis:connectivity is a key concept in grasping how military music has helped to (trans)form our world.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.

Ann-Sophie Schoepfel

Ann-Sophie Schoepfel

Ann-Sophie Schoepfel’s intellectual background covers History, Art History, Anthropology, International Relations, International Law, and Legal History along with stops in Paris, Heidelberg, Tokyo, Hanoi and Harvard. Her research on the colonialist implications of war-crimes trials in Asia as well as on Vietnamese migration in the context of the Cold War has earned her numerous awards and academic honors.

 

Ann-Sophie’s current research at global dis:connect centers Afro-Asian voices — jurists, writers, and anticolonial revolutionaries — from across the French former colonial empire, as they struggled to reimagine state sovereignty and international law in the Cold War crucible.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.

Sujit Sivasundaram_groß

Sujit Sivasundaram

Sujit has taken a circuitous path to his current post as Professor of World History and Director of the Centre of South Asian Studies in Cambridge. Bouncing between the Asia-Pacific region and Europe, he has left his mark on imperial history, oceanic history, cultural history, and the history of science. This path has taken him through the LSE, the EHESS in Paris, the Universities of Singapore and Sydney, and the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

 

During his fellowship with us in Munich, Sujit will be focusing on the long history of Colombo. He is interested in the challenges of building a city such as this, at the centre of the Indian Ocean, in a marshy terrain, and the labour and community formation that met such an environmental challenge. He will be developing his perspective on connection as an unstable practice, especially when tied to capitalism and empire, because of its potential to segment and divide places and people. He is also interested in the art and visual practice surrounding this city and what it tells us of how globalisation is visualised and propagandised.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

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Sabine Soergel

Sabine Sörgel

Sabine Sörgel combines her passion for travel and dance with sophisticated, philosophically informed theories derived from critical theory, philosophy, sociology, and theatre. Through sojourns in Mainz, Aberystwyth, London, and Jamaica, Sabine has published on performance, post-colonial politics, global culture, and the social power implicated in various gazes.

 

While visiting global dis:connect, Sabine is researching how public performances over the last decade have invoked images of race, identity, rights, history, and memory.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.

Callie Wilkinson Profile Pic

Callie Wilkinson

Callie Wilkinson studies the dramatic expansion of the British Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and its sociocultural impact at home and abroad. In previous research projects conducted at Cambridge and the University of Warwick, she has examined how the idea of indirect rule was contested within the British East India Company as well as the contemporary debates on the extent to which information about the Company should be disseminated to the public.

At global:disconnect, Callie is investigating how Company soldiers’ testimony affected broader discourses about the Company’s military operations in an age before professional war correspondents.

Click HERE for a list of publications.

Click HERE to send email.